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20131207
20131207
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 6:00pm PST
congress. started in 1912, the anc was created to peacefully advocate for political rights for south africa's blacks. mandela sees the future of the organization. >> he said we at the anc wanted to be a mass organization, and we needed a mass leader. and wen thun day nelson mandela walked into his office. he realized that's the guy. >> reporter: he becomes mandela's mentor and encourages him to earn a law degree. he also introduces mandela to his young cousin, evelyn masi. the two marry in 1946 and welcomed their first child, a son, that same year. their family will eventually grow to include another son and a daughter. another daughter had been born in 1947 but died within a year. racism and segregation had existed in south africa for as long as there had been white settlers, the majority of them were descendants of the dutch and call themselves afrikaners. in 1948 the national party sweeps boo powers and codifies those apartheid policies into law. >> they were trying to achieve this kind of ethnic fragmentation of the country here in order to give the afrikaner nation its own homel
PBS
Dec 7, 2013 12:00am PST
stopped being successful, i turned the anc into a military armed wing because my plate goal, my overriding principle was premium for my people and justice for my people and anything that would get me there was what road i would take, that's a pragmatist, a pragmatic politician, not a saint. >> rose: jerry? >> yes, you know, i agree, rick is heartfelt on that because he was very pragmatic but one of my reflect shunls after 20 plus years is how real he was. i mean, you know, if you saw him flirtatious or joyful or festive or playful, it was that way when you were behind the scenes or when you were in front of the camera. but wow know, when he went out on any public appearance, howie was being, how he was being projected, how he was moving, i will tell you a very interesting story when we were back back as a family to see him right at towards the end, when the world cup was there. we walked into have just a little personal time with him and he said to me, how did we do? and that is an amazing comment, because he was so interested in how the country reflected around the world, how t
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 5:00pm PST
their anc representatives out of the country and all over the world talking about what was going on. i introduced legislation in the california state assembly where i was serving to divest all of our pension funds from businesses that were doing business in south africa. that caught fire. and investment started all over the united states in various legislatures. the young people on the college campuses started to march and rally. transafrica forms and began to sit in at the south african embassy. we closed down the south african council here in los angeles, so the movement took hold. and we added to that the sanctions, the rallies, the protests, the education about what was going on, and it brought apartheid to an end. >> yeah, i think the key point if that is the grass-roots movement of divestment as the predicate to sanctions. it became the national government's policy version of what universities and cities and states and all sorts of cities were working on on a grass-roots level. i want to bring in thomas frank, author of "the wrecking crew." tom, there's an amazing chapter in t
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
anc and it's cause. and it also helped to further undermine the integrity of the apartheid regime there. >> i think that much credit should be given to organizations like transafrica to the senate and on the house side who continued to push sanctions forward. i must say against stout resistance from the republican admissioadministration that wasn office under ronald reagan. >> thethey were important and ty helped support the struggle there. and to begin to discredit the apartheid regime internationally and in the eyes of many the current campaining against south africa is a fad and morale hoola hoop and fun for a while. was that mostly because of cold war thinking at that time? there was a feeling that the anc was communist? >> i think so. there were many politicians in the united states and globally in western countries who felt that the anc was in fact an off shoot of the south african communist party. that it was affiliated with the larger com communist movement globally. i think they misunderstood history and they misunderstood the desire of black people across africa and sout
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2013 5:00am PST
, he never would have been allowed in the country. that's because he was a member of the anc the liberation movement that not apartheid in south africa for decades. movement that the white apartheid threw mandela in prison for being a part of, giving him a light sentence after releasing him after 27 years in captivity, even then, even in the summer of 1990, those first months after he had finally been let out of jail. even as south africa was finally starting to take those first frazzled steps away from apartheid in towards real genuine multi-racial draerks even then as nelson mandela was being hailed as a hero, all across the globe, the united states government officially considered him a member of a terrorist organization. they forced him to endure the endignitary of receiving a waiver of being told in effect, sure, come on in, we will give you some rewards, call you a hero. you are the revepgsception. the rest of the anc, we think they are terrorists. it wasn't until 2008 that congress passed and president george w. bush, not his father, it wasn't until five years ago the u.s.
Al Jazeera America
Dec 7, 2013 10:00am EST
armed wing of the anc of the they would gather and meet to discuss strategies, what to do and where to go next. nelson mandela was dedicated to speak to a senior anc member at that particular time. other members of the anc were here. 50 years ago. the police raided the farm. many were arrested. we had the trial, the moment in the country's history, the scene of his very famous speech. among those who would have faced trial was harold wolkey. he fled overseas into exile. his son, nic nicholas is now the trustee and he joins me now. nicholas, what type of legacy do you think has been left by these giants like mandela and others? >> i think the legacy that they have left comes down to selfless sacrifice. the desire to bring about a change, putting their own needs, their own wants, their own desires second for the cause to insure that a better south africa, a democratic free south africa where all south africas are equal regardless of race creed religion. they are personified those ideals, they carried forward those ideals not only in word but in deed. to one where democracy and equalit
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 11:00pm EST
began to funnel into the prison and where they met ma mandela and te other anc lieder leaders who wee heavily influenced by them. the older men learned a lot by the youth that came into the island and it became an ep pi center of two give generations discussing how to end the apartheid government. that is why it's so significant in the nature of this country and the legacy of nelson mandela. >> it remained wi winnie's homer a number of years did nelson mandela ever go back to the house? >> he go he spent a short while here when he came out of prison. the first thing he did was come home where he was greeted by hundredses of thousands of people from this particular area his wife remained here for much of the time he was in prison. she was removed from the house and banished to a remote town hundreds of miles away from johannesburg both as punishment and to remove her and mande mans influence his daughter continued to remain in the house i. it gives you a taste to see how bad and repressive that they were at that time. and a 17-year-old daughter left to fend for herself in this house. >
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2013 7:00am PST
. he embodied the anc's approach, their principles. but he wasn't the only one. during my time in south africa, especially in the late '80s, when apartheid still existed, i met any number of south african, leaders, rank and pile, who had been through terrible injustice. fellow graduates of robin island, for example. people who had been tortured or under banning orders. and almost to a person i heard similar words from them that we heard from nelson mandela after he was released from prison. and in many ways my love for south africa and my inspiration from south africans came from those years when mandela was still in prison, when we didn't even know what he looked like because there was only one old picture. he was the leader. he was the "avatar" of the movement. but there's much, much more, and he was standing on a firm base, firm foundation. >> you know, it's been surprising, mark, you know, on the one handle, this effort to sanitize mandela that we're seeing now, you know, i'm trying to make this kind of play around king, and yet also -- and this is maybe even more surprising to me t
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 6:00pm PST
free talk to us said back then very real challenges that exist for the anc that. while the poem at the moment. this is a considerable amount of corruption south africa and stories about corruption and boned and use it also that the society's to read oh three made racially polarized colorful polka to benjamin was the monks months to rectify that has to be said that very few boys actually voted for the free soul of the month mendoza province and he couldn't persuade them to support his political coffin. i'm voting continues to be more of this moment line. also coincides to the pool this is the rich to some extent. one of their increasing numbers of reach back to swell. but to the society's to live with a deeply divided when i was quite a lot of distrust we've come becomes apparent in court cases which opened for the two women. when the victims from one rife with conflict is another things tend to be drawn before. ha we can keep the killing. sequim musicians are guthrie and dealing county fair this evening preparing to perform in a small nineteenth century church for the twelfth annua
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 5:00pm PST
had stuck by him personally and by the anc, the african national congress, his party, during his long 27 years in prison and castro did and mandela never forget it. >> reporter: in 1964, mandela and other anc leaders faced the death penalty accused of trying to over throw the government by force. >> we believed that the death sentence was going to be passed on some of us, and that is how we should be mortals and disappear under a cloud of glory. >> reporter: mandela, the revolutionary found common purpose with socialist, communist and other revolutionary leaders like gaddafi. >> cuba, iran, all my friends and i propose to honor that friendship. i welcome the friendship with the united states of america and other powers. >> reporter: the united states put mandela on the terror watch list. it wasn't until 2008 that president george w. bush removed him from it. what did mandela think of being called a terrorist? >> i tell other people who say those struggling for operation as a terrorist, i tell them that i was also a terrorist yesterday, but today i'm admired by the very people who said
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 11:00am PST
, the anc was a radical revolutionary organization. it drew a lot of support from communist countries, from revolutionary movements, castro, gadhafi, arafat. everyone thought he was going to be a left wing maniac. he was very pro business. he was very pro markets because he understood the future of south africa depended on the white business class staying there, being productive. interestingly, 27 years in prison he came out of an old left wing background. he didn't bust the budget spending money on blacks. because of that corporations trusted him. they understood that he didn't want to nationalize anything. he's asking us to behave ethically. i think it's a very good model for the future for third world leaders, particularly to look at. you can, you know, as long as you understand the power of the market, you can also understand that you can ask businesspeople to behave honorably. >> your prime time special "global lessons on guns" tomorrow night 7:00 p.m. right here on cnn. thank you. >>> coming up, elton john, shania twain, celine dion, the next music icon to join these legends in
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2013 11:00am PST
was able to do that in time. but as you note, many regimes, many governments saw him and the anc as terrorists and responded accordingly. >> one of the things that's always struck me about nelson mandela's life was here was a guy who could have had the ultimate chip on his shoulder. and not once did you ever see or hear or read about public bitterne bitterness. nelson mandela never displayed any sort of public bitterness. >> i think nelson mandela, consistent with martin luther king and gandhi and others, i think recognized when he emerged from that prison cell that if he were going to lead south africa, he needed a message not only of reconciliation but of a multiracial south africa. and he did a great job in presenting that message. and i think he surprised people that when he emerged from 27 years of imprisonment, i don't think anyone can imagine what it would be like to spend that much time in a narrow jail cell, to be cut off and then to come back and be so lucid, so politically astute, so politically aware and really emerge as one of the great leaders of our times. >> donald,
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 4:00pm PST
realities of how individuals regarded both the anc and more specifically, nelson mandela in all these eulogies? >> i think no doubt we are. nelson mandela's spiritual giant, political revolutionary, we are witnessing the santa clausification of nelson mandel. a we turned the revolutionary into an old man with a toy bag. no longer really full of the fire. we can at 95, brother nelson mandela was still full of fire. he had that militant tenderness and sub versive sweetness and radical gentleness, tied to refusing to be fearful or intimidated in the face of a vicious white supremacist apartheid regime. >> ted cruz, the senator from texas, paid respect on facebook. he said nelson mandela will live in history for defenders of liberty around the globe. someone said he was a murderer and a communist. another one said sad to see you feel this way. he was a terrorist. i guess you have only seen the hollywood movies. getting away from what the comment section of the internet generally is, let's talk about some of these specific charges. communist, terrorist. where do they come from? >> we
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 4:00pm PST
opponents of anc fought on. one of the first stories i covered was in the anc township where it's zulu warriors from a hostile that marched in the dead of night and slaughtered 40 people women and children among them. so, you know, it was not a simple matter of de klerk deciding to negotiate and everything got easy. you know, white bitter enders assassinated the head of the communist party, one of the most promising young black leaders around that time. a bunch of kind of resistance types tried to storm one of the african so-called homelands. so there were people who tried to keep the fight going. but the balance just had had shift sod dramatically that, you know, de klerk was a realist. and they desperately needed a realist on the other side of the table. >> mr. delms, when i was talking about nelson mandela right before he was officially elected, he gave a lot of credit to the united states. i thought he was being very generous in saying our country was the most -- enemy of the world. do you think united states a as major player in getting him liber liberated and getting his par
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2013 1:00pm PST
that the anc was a communist organization and trying to improve the appearance of south africa in the eyes of the west. they -- we have found this quote from a senior south african military intelligence person who said, quote, our strategy was to paint the anc as communist surrogates, the more we could present ourselves as anti-communists, the more people looked at us with respect. people you could have hardly believed cooperated with us politically when it came to the soviets. i mean, april, i was able to find that in like five minutes online. >> yeah. well, i want to put this in perspective. i talked to former president bill clinton yesterday. did an interview with him and he said, you know, with this issue about nelson mandela and his friendships and those who supported him, like gadhafi and ka castro, he said we don't look like ourselves view themselves. when we went on the tour, the historic africa tour with bill clinton in the second term and joburg, nelson mandela was asked a question about the friendships and nelson mandela himself said, look, if you don't like my friendship,
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 5:00pm PST
for a taco in ninety seven mile trip back to the fountain that the threat that the anc can never rule south africa anyone who's to say was living in cloud and pianist david cameron is also a brown that might make a trip to south africa as a rising star nick has had to meet friends at anzac day when no peeing again sanctions on the apartheid weakness in the second day i'm sometimes add a nice milk in a way that david cameron was custody in full but suddenly feel my face and he fails to wallace and it was the syndicate saving the us cannot be even more today to ten seconds we have a taste a few nights a month in month that it was on that evidence and he and his face is wet dream in the state's basic until it flakes of two thousand and eight. but knowing it's off to his presidency of south africa was already a bath now likely coldest it has been a canvas and would eat out i've done this night. in south africa. he's the man who pulled a couple too divided and that from the brink of civil war the man who up to twenty seven tough years behind bars will be from prison. in his heart was an ul
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 8:00pm PST
said that the anc can never rule south africa anyone who's to say was that when patrick and that is david cameron is also around that might make a trip to south africa as a rising star in the consent to meet friends at anzac day when milk being a king sanctions on the apartheid me and said miss acne. i'm still not done that i still can a way that david cameron was cussing in full but suddenly feel my face and he builds two wallets and it was a cynic might say bring the usb not to be even more today because of his rehabilitation if you died at ninety let my dad was on that evidence and he and his face is when the news that takes place in snow as late as two thousand and eight. but knowing it's off to his presidency of south africa was already a bath that was our team's laura smith reporting. an ona arms mentally ill man has just been charged with assault an incident where police officers shot killing innocent bystanders near times square. the man being charged is glenn brought snacks and police are holding an axe fall for the injuries because they say he instigated the incident the a
Al Jazeera America
Dec 7, 2013 1:00pm EST
regime would be toppled. the police raided this farm 50 years ago and arrested members of the anc. mandela was on his way back to his farm when he was arrested the by a roadblock, beginning the long, long prison sentence he served behind bars. man came to light candles and lay flowers. many events taking place, this is what a spokesman for the family has to say. >> on behalf of thema of of thea family, we have grave sadness for the passing of nelson mandela two days ago. >> the words of nelson mandela of what became known as the ra rabonia trial. he said i have stood against white domination. i have stood against black domination. i have always cherished a society of democracy where people can live in opportunity. >> racial integration is still a problem in south africa. after two decades an ever the end of apartheid we talk with an interracial couple in johannesburg to see the challenges they face. >> nelson mandela brough fought inequality, and now today couples don't have to hide their relationship but being a mixed race couple still has their challenges. >> people have accepte
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 3:00am PST
known as a terrorist organize. the anc had been fanned anyway. people like fidel castro in cuba supported mandela. >> when he came out of prison, he spoke very loudly about my friend fidel castro. >> he's been condemned in certain countries for the so-called terrorism. >> here's the video. they embraced. >> mandela then made a plea to clinton in 1996 he said let us lift the sanctions that the u.s. has imposed against cuba. here is what clinton had to say. >> sometimes, he could be very serious and say i just don't understand why you don't lift the embargo. and i said, well, i think we were about to do it before they shot down those planes illegally in the brothers to the rescue tragedy. and then congress removed the right to lift the embargo. and sometimes, had was just joking about it but underneath all of that, there was mandela's fierce loyalty to anybody who had stuck by him personally and by the anc, the african national congress, his party, during his long 27 years in prison. and castro did. and mandela never forgot it. >> a fiercely loyal man. he embraced yasser arafat, c
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 6:00pm PST
black violence there was a tremendous violence between the anc and cata rival movement, lack of social trust. so you could have drawn a very negative scenario for south of ca. in fact, i ronuously did so in some of my reporting down there because i just felt bad social fabric. and it's very hard for leaders to counterago that. >> woodruff: even after he was released. >> right, i was involved in riot, people getting killed. it was ugly. and yet i think by force of moral example h thises with one of those rare case when somebody at the top of society really has a cultural effect. and leads, really averts what could have been quite a disaster. and the country did much, much better in the ensuing years. i think because sheer moral example. >> woodruff: mark, what about you? what do you think of when you think of him? >> well,-- some leaders are respected, and few leaders are loved. nelson mandela is that unique figure who is both loved and respected, virtually around the globe. it's a remarkable achievement. and what i think of is he described resentment as the poison we drink hoping it wi
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 7:00pm PST
massacres of nineteen sixty two nd day and date of the anc decided on armed struggle and there were all those years that followed where mandela was imprisoned and it was a lot of violence the movers were called and the frontline states. how did that happen that transformation and calm so that there was. he's a peaceful transition. we'll post our apartheid south africa. i have been nice will the hokkaido in addition to the whitley the push to get it the old people are a team in the political activity in south africa that was to be the key was on the whole crew monday and i went into hiding. and at the euro happen all the options you can try at the armstrong. we know what happened after that call. the try of the group in ireland and the leaders of the season the apartment and into the ocean the young man who was working patient who was angry was when the two week as the model used this week on the porch looking at he underwent an hour or so the duration. even when the warden the presumption to commission appointed by the week. archbishop who wrote about yesterday. due to the pan and t
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 8:00am PST
was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us next in the "newsroom." thanks for giving me your smile. thanks for inspiring me. thanks for showing me my potential. for teaching me not to take life so seriously. thanks for loving me and being my best friend. don't forget to thank those who helped you take charge of your future and got you where you are today. the boss of your life. the chief life officer. ♪ are still high in acidic content. if your enamel is exposed to acid and you brush it away, you know
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 10:00pm EST
number one. step number two i think there's state and ance for local leaders as well, in terms focus tong the overall problem solving. third, i suspect over a short period of time a large grassroots network of people who are looking for problem solvers in their elected officials, probably a million people in every congressional district in this country is what we want to have in the next several months. i think we're a good part of the way there. so if you think of no labels, i think of problem solving. i want you to think of a group that's also proving the concept. it isn't just catchy phrases and nice sound bites, but we're we're justneedle and getting it going. and i'm excited about where this is leading to, because we have nation.e in this we have no choice. ahead will have to be about problem solving. t will be about getting taxes right, debt right, education right, getting the foundational building blocks of this nation in a place where we can actually get our house in order. that's what it so desperately needed right now. so we're delighted to be here. we thank you for listeni
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 7:30pm EST
of the anc, were revolutionaries. it was by any means necessary. i think that they would--we should look at it as a revolutionary. now where he was as an older man, as the president of his country, as someone who bought into this idea of capitalism and cooperation with the west, and how people fared after the turnover in government, this lack of redistribution of wealth that has not occurred in south africa. >> we're going talk about that. but talking about history. your family lived under apartheid in south africa. talk to us what that young mandela meant to south africa at that time. >> i think mandela represented a voice for people to stand up for what was inherently wrong. we cannot have a minority group oppressing. for me he was a political activist who stood up for what he believed in. and made it a point by any means necessary, even if it meant that he died, he would. so for me he was very powerful in being the voice and representing one cause that people could unify and follow. >> you used the word radical and the community jumped on this. >> and he has been known as a terro
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)